Exploring Liminality; An Intro

Recently I read The Well of D’yerree-in-Dowan, in which three brothers are sent out to find a sacred well at the end of the world which would heal their father, and whichever brother brought back the water from this well would follow as king. After reaching the first crossroad, only one brother ventured forth, while the other two remained at an inn. The brother, Cart, travels throughout the day, and as night is falling, comes upon a house in the woods and is boarded by an old woman. She sends him on his way to find her older sister. After two more visits to the older sisters, Cart then encounters a brother, who leads him to island the well is on. Cart collects some water, kisses some ladies, and returns to his father. And in the end, after some problems with his brothers, he is recognized as the heir. While there are many relevant points we can take away from this tale, the one I want to focus on is the Otherworldly, liminal aspect. Cart is tasked with undertaking a journey to the end of the world, which we can understand to be in an Otherworld. The help he encounters along the way is found at liminal places (crossroads) and times (dusk). These themes are not exclusive to this story; rather, they are very common in many Irish tales, especially echtrai and immrama. So what is it about liminality that we can incorporate into our modern practices?

In the course of our daily, secular lives, we encounter many liminal places. Every time we take a drive, whether to work or school or the grocery store, we come across a crossroad. These intersections were once a place where many travelers from different places, going different places encountered one another, something that may have never happened had they not been journeying. Even today, where inns at the crossroads have been replaced by restaurants and shopping malls and coffee shops, we can still encounter people who are outside our spheres of influence. And in acknowledging that openness of the crossroad, we can also be open to interacting with spiritual creatures.

With liminal times, such as dawn and dusk or any transition of season, our perception of the world in which we live is altered, to the point where it is almost as if we are in another world. It is during these times of transition that the world in which we live and the Otherworlds are closest. Not only are these optimum times for which to undertake spiritual journeys, but also for communicating with spirits, Ancestors, and other various Gods and Ungods, and, of course, for spiritual workings.